w123 – Gwagen

717.400
starter on right side, for om61x and 280e etc.

1st 3.82 : 1
2nd 2.202 : 1
3rd 1.398 : 1
4th 1 : 1
5th 0.813 : 1

reverse 3.705 : 1

717.420 supposedly “identical” to the 717.400
starter on right side, for om61x and 280e etc. fitted to the w460 G-wagen

1st 3.82 : 1
2nd 2.202 : 1
3rd 1.398 : 1
4th 1 : 1
5th 0.813 : 1

reverse 3.705 : 1

711.110 = G1/18-5/6,15

Gears / ratio

1st gear / 6,157
2nd gear / 3,148
3rd gear / 1,743
4th gear / 1,278
5th gear / 1
reverse / 5,347

711.113 = G1/18-5/4,7

Gears / ratio

1st gear / 4,695
2nd gear / 2,401
3rd gear / 1,436
4th gear / 1
5th gear / 0,806
reverse / 4,078

717.401 – single mass flywheel

starter on left side, (from a 230E w123)

Getrag 717401 (1) Getrag 717401 (5)

 

Other cars, w201, w124, w460/g-wagen etc

717.411 single mass
717.412 single mass
717.413 dual mass
717.416 (found on 2.2liter cdi and c180 m111)
717.430 single mass
717.431 single mass
717.432 dual mass
717.433 dual mass

 

717.404 (190E 2.3-16) single mass flywheel
Gear ratios (5-speed Getrag)
5th (1.00) 3.27:1
4th (1.26) 4.12:1
3rd (1.77) 5.79:1
2nd (2.52) 8.24:1
1st (4.08) 13.34:1
Final drive ratio: 3.27:1 (LSD)

717.410 from 190d 2.0/2.2
Gear ratios (5-speed)
5th (0.84)
4th (1.00)
3rd (1.49)
2nd (2.36)
1st (4.23)

717.412 single mass

5th (0.771)
4th (1)
3rd (1.37)
2nd (2.17)
1st (3.91)

717.430 single mass flywheel
Gear ratios (5-speed)
5th (0.80) 2.46:1
4th (1.00) 3.07:1
3rd (1.38) 4.24:1
2nd (2.18) 6.69:1
1st (3.86) 11.85:1

717.433 dual mass flywheel
Found paired with the m103 engines aswell as the NA om603 and om606 in the 124 chassies

 

717.435 (190E 2.6) single mass flywheel
Gear ratios (5-speed)
5th (0.80) 2.62:1
4th (1.00) 3.27:1
3rd (1.38) 4.51:1
2nd (2.18) 7.13:1
1st (3.86) 12.62:1
Final drive ratio: 3.27:1

717.436 Getrag? fifth gear being 1:1
Seems to have been fitted to the om602 engine?

1st 4.905
2nd 2.716
3rd 1.817
4th 1.261
5th 1.0
Reverse 4,625

717.439 Getrag?
Supposedly found on the G-wagen chassis 460, 461, 463,
On engines m102, m103 and om603 among others.

1st 3,856
2nd,182
3rd 1,365
4th 1
5th 0,799
Reverse 4,218

717.450 (300ce 24v and 3.4 AMG CE) dual mass flywheel
Gear ratios (5-speed)
5th (1)
1:1 in fifth gear, dogleg gearbox, first gear backwards
(some people reported broken third gear somewhere around 300hp om603)

717.460 (250TDT w202) 3.64 differential (i think)

Also found in the
w202 C200 kompressor, C230 Kompressor, c220cdi,  c250 TDT and C250 DT
w210 e290 TDT, E200 kompressor, E280
R170, SLK 200K and 230K
Supposedly also found on the C36 AMG, but im not shure about that one ever popping up with a fivespeed manual stock.

 

716 gearboxes, sixspeed found in för example 2cdi and kompressor CLK etc

 

1st gear – 5.014
2nd gear – 2.831
3rd gear – 1.789
4th gear – 1.256
5th gear – 1.000
6th gear – 0.828
Reverse – 4.569

29 thoughts on “Mercedes manual transmissions”

  1. Could someone advice me? I’ve Got 3.0 M103, and i want to turbocharge it, but i can’t decide which Gearbox should i take, I want it to handle great amount of torque, so please, tell me what manual gearbox is the toughest? :)

    1. the sixspeed from a 270CDI (straight engine)
      like the 716.654 or something would be my choice, sixspeed, overdrive on sixth gear, the same gearbox that Hansebanger77 uses if you look on youtube.

  2. I have a 1990 190e 2.6 4-spd Auto that I’m planning to swap to a 5 speed from a 1984 190. I will also be using a 3.27 LSD from a Cosworth. Will the gear ratios from the 1984 190 work for my 2.6?
    Thank you,
    AJ

    1. the fivespeed would be a overdrive in fifth most def, and with a 3.27 it would be pretty much like a stock 2.6 with a fivespeed would behave.

      you would probably need a different cardanshaft cause the automatic and manual are different in lenght,

      the 3.27 LSD from a Cosworth is a good choice,
      and any gearbox ought to survive the power of the 2.6 engine

    1. the 717.402 has the starter on the right side, and thus fits the om617 and m110, witch also the 717.400 does, and the early iron-fivespeeds in the w114/r107
      the 402 is form what ive found with an “inductive” speedometer, and not the mechanic that is in hte 717.400, its was made for the r107 i think.

      i found a post on peachpart where someone had “checked” the ratio by himself. and it was something like:
      R = 3.69/1
      1 = 3.84/1
      2 = 2.21/1
      3 = 1.39/1
      4 = 1/1
      5 = .81/1 over drive
      http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/1346467-post2.html

    1. yes, they are interchangeable, you need to make sure you have the right flywheel, (get that from the engine you take the gearbox from if different)
      dualmass for dualmass gearboxes, singlemass for singlemassgearboxes.

      the m111 had a lot of different gearboxes, sixspeed 716.6xx etc, and those is another gearbox totaly than the 717.4xx found on the om602.
      and thus needs modifications in shifter, tunnel or driveshaft.

    1. Non would fit straight away as far as i know, the best bet would be to reweld a BMW gearbox to fit your engine, quite easy, althou i have no immediate suggestion on what manual flywheel would fit the engine.
      Hope you work it out

      Best Regards.

  3. Hello, I own a S210 250 Turbo Diesel and it has manual 5 speed transmission and am considering a 6 speed swap. I was talking to a friend and shop owner about possible 6 speed swaps for better Fuel Consumption as well as highway cruising comfort. He told me that until the 2000s Mercedes never invested much into fitting the right transmission with the right engine and making all the right adjustments for a “perfect fit”. It was mostly getting a durable OM6xxx engine with a durable gearbox and voilà. Having said that which gearbox/diff combo would best fit this? I’ve been advised for anything with a ratio higher than 2.87. Possibly a 3.07 would be perfect match? I was looking into getting all this from a w210 220 CDI with 6 speed and 143hp (to match my 150hp) or even a w211 220 CDI that has exactly 150hp. Do you have any advice on such a swap? thank you!

    1. The sixspeed vs the fivespeed wont affect mileage that much, both the fivespeeds on the w124 and w210 (+w202 and most w201s) had 1:1 in fourth, and about 0.8 something in fifth, about the same as the sixspeeds have in fifth and sixth gear.

      the 3.07 is a nice ratio with a gearbox with overdrive, depending on speed and torque, a 2.88 might be good aswell.

      To me it seems like a lot of work, the stock fivespeed isnt a “fun” gearbox, but with stock power out of your om605 turbo it should survive good, and mileage wont be better with a sixspeed unless you also swap the differential. and not by much. What RPM is your engine when doing 100km/h today?

      I would not consider it worth it to be honest if you arent running a tuned engine, and in that case the sixspeed Mercedes gearbox is a good start, but a rewelded BMW a stronger one.

      1. Thank you for the reply! I believe it is between 2500rpm and 3000rpm, mostly near the 3000rpm. I was told the a complete swap (dual mass, clutch, diff, shaft, gearbox) would be the thing to do as opposed to individual part swapping. As for the diff I already have in my s210 I don’t know for sure as it wasn’t an engine commonly bought throughout europe, or that well documented for that reason. Maybe a 2.87? I was told going higher would give me better MPG. The guy who told me this had a Sprinter van changed to a 3.07 and basically lowered from 8.5L/100km to about 6.7L/100km at around 120kph-140kph.

        I don’t usually drive at those speeds for economy reasons too other my S210 will return something like 10L/100km on motorway cruising, which to me is too much for a mere 65L tank.

        Could this be possible even for the hassle it might be? I can get parts easily and labor is at no cost for me. Maybe the s211 6 speed, shaft, dual mass and clutch + a 3.07 diff would do the trick without disrupting horsepower too much? If not this was would possibly “better manage” the engine fuel consumption as I have friends with a W202 same engine doing 40+ MPG and I am stuck in low 30s even 20s sometimes. Thank you!

        1. hmm,by doing a tad math, 2500rpm and a fivespeed gearbox with a fifth-gear ratio of 3.64 would net you at 100km/h.
          so thats what i would guess you have today.
          a 3.07 would bring you down to about 2100rpm in the same speed – a huge difference in how its experienced.

          a 3.07 differential and a sixspeed gearbox wont net you a lower rpm than a 3.07 and you current fivespeed, and if the labour and parts are “free” it might be a cool thing, but the sixspeed has a quite different shifter, (custom fabrication) aswell as probably being a bit longer, and you have to weld and balance the cardan-shaft/driveshaft…

          low 30s, and sometimes 20s seems crazy, are we talking UK-mpg or US-mpg btw?
          it might be worth checking timing of the engine, and looking up everything else at it.

          im pretty shure the om602 turbo had a 3.07 differential paired to the fivespeed, but my w202 om605 turbo, basicly your car but a w202, had if im not misstaken, a 3.64 differential (you claiming 2500rpm @ 100km/h something seems correct)

          1. Hello, so in your opinion i have two possible outcomes: 1. try six-speed + my current 3.64 diff? 2. keep my 5speed and switch the 3.64 to a 3.07 diff? In the case of the latter, would it be a simple swap with no welding or changing other transmission components I already have? This seems more interesting than switching the whole transmission system. I did the math just yesterday as my car was at the shop and I was unable to drive it. I averaged 28 UK MPG after 15L of fuel. Driving was mostly highway, cruising at 90-120kmh. Does this sound right? I believe it should be a little lower than that. I have been able to average 33-35 UK MPG in the past but that is not going past 100kmh and doing mainly highway cruising. Thank you for your knowledge! It’s amazing!

          2. No, sorry, not what i meant,
            my thought is two alternatives you could get a 3.07 and put it behind either the stock fivespeed, or the 3.07 behind the sixspeed, both versions will be the same rpm doing 100km/h (moreorless) and thus the same MPG.
            the advantage of the sixspeed would be acceleration, where you have an extra gear distributed, and thus could be in the right RPM easier, but that isnt that big of an advantage in my opinion to justify a swap (unless you are planing to put a modified pump and larger turbo where the sixspeed is a tad stronger)

            my om602 equiped w123 had a 3.07 differential, i somewhat easy did 0.65l/10km driving fast, and 0.7 liter when doing 130-140km/h and burnouts,
            that is in UK MPG 43mpg vs 39 UK MPG when driving more aggresive.

            i dont think i ever was as low 33MPG except when pulling a heavy trailer, or realy aggresive driving in city etc.

            it might not be a fair comparison, but your MPG seems crazy to be honest, even if i have better diesel, and keep the tires inflated and the brakes in perfect condition the difference is a tad to big.
            if im not misstaken, the w210 om606 when doing a realy long trip (at about 100km/h and having people sleeping in the car, so driving “perfect” consumptionwise) we had a consumption somewhere along 45MPG (E300TDT w210) but better than that would be difficult.

            To answer your question, yes, a 3.07 swap ought to be more or less a straight swap,
            There is a huge difference in differentials between the cars, even in the same chassie, “huge” differences that in reality is quite smal, but can put up some big problems.
            i have never tried swapping the diff of a w210, but iv heard that those is supposed to fit on a w124 (so probably the other way too)

            anyhow, what you need to measure is the width (this doesnt seem to be that important since the axleshafts take up some of these changes)
            but what i had problem with trying to fit a larger diff into a w201 was that the lenght of the differential was about +2cm if i recall correctly, and those 2cm made it impossible to fit the differential to the driveshaft/cardanshaft (however you want to call it)
            i got a shaft from a w201 260E in case i ever try and go down that route again (shorter, and made for big diff)

            i would suggest you measure the lenght + width of the differential, and from that i could measure my w124/w201 differentials and see if they are alike, or you just measure and try and find another one.

            ( i think the automatic w210 om606turbo had 2.87 as differential ratio)

  4. Oh I should add that it is not getting worse MPG wise, that range of mileage is what I am able to obtain as of right now. I have not taken the car on a roadtrip just yet with only highway miles on it. So all this is mostly 30% town driving (where I can usually use 4th and 5th sometimes) + 70% highway (5th all the way).

    1. my suggestion, try and fit a 3.07 differential (or 3.27) and see how it feels and how MPG is affected :)

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